PDA

View Full Version : The Christian sub-culture


Orpheus42
04-02-02, 09:33 AM
How much is too much? How do we balance the need to corporately be salt and light with the need for fellowship and to be "not of the world"? I think a lot of times Christians forget that the first part of that passage says we are in the world.

How much of the Christian sub-culture is commercial in nature? Think about it... CCM, Veggie Tales, the vast market of superficial Christian books (don't get me wrong, there's a lot of good stuff being written, but it seems like the major emphasis is on milk and not meat)... what do you think about this?

How could the negative aspect of this be changed from withdrawal from society into evangelism?

Peace, Love, and Jesus Christ,

Jason

Multimom
04-02-02, 03:15 PM
Jason:

Just a note, Veggie Tales is directed at Children which is why its the "milk" and not the "meat".

Orpheus42
04-02-02, 06:41 PM
This I know, but I was referring to the commercial aspect. Veggie Tales, actually, is far from superficial from what I've seen. The point was to include an example of what could be seen as commercialism, and that was one of the first things that came to mind. It doesn't mean Veggie Tales are BAD ;)

Flannel Avenger
04-02-02, 11:19 PM
LARRYHATER!!!!!!


;)

:angel:

Actually, I read something about this the other day. It's true that there is a very commercialized Christian sub culture. But the Left Behind books are the only thing that haven't been commercialized!


(I put in that last part to watch Jason's head explode. For the record, I'm actually a little irked that it's taking them soooo long to put them in paperback. Talk about milking it for all it's worth...)

Breni Sue
04-03-02, 02:26 AM
I put in that last part to watch Jason's head explode :rofl:

I would disagree though that the "Left Behind" books haven't been commercialized (as much as I love reading them! :D ). Next time you walk into a Christian book store, make note of all the "Left Behind" keychains, necklaces, and various other knick-knacks with the logo. In my local store, they have a whole section dedicated to the books and merchandise. On the one hand, it is great that they are using this series to get God's message through to people. But on the other hand, you have the merchadisers using that to make money off it's popularity. I think that is just wrong. Even God Himself isn't exempt from exploitation, so it seems.How much of the Christian sub-culture is commercial in nature? Think about it... CCM, Veggie Tales, the vast market of superficial Christian books (don't get me wrong, there's a lot of good stuff being written, but it seems like the major emphasis is on milk and not meat)... what do you think about this?I think it's wonderful that people are coming up with these creative ideas to "draw" other into the faith, get them interested and wanting to learn more. But after that, then what? Most of the books I see seem to be geared toward "starter Christians", if you will. But not much is out there for those of us who want to move beyond that and really dig deeper into it. Which causes me to wonder that these people's real objectives are - is it to gain believers and help them to understand the Gospel? Or is it to make money? (or a little bit of both, maybe?) Or maybe it's because that even they themselves are not well-educated as far as "advanced" Christianity. (sidenote) - I think that for the most part, these folks are sincere in their motives, but sometimes the love of money can cloud one's judgement. ;) How could the negative aspect of this be changed from withdrawal from society into evangelism? Um, let me think on that and get back to ya! ;)

Flannel Avenger
04-03-02, 07:59 AM
I just said that "Left Behind" hadn't been commercialized to tease Jason :angel: I really think they've gone a little bit overboard.

Orpheus42
04-03-02, 08:02 AM
:redhotmad

;)

:p

:rofl:

Multimom
04-03-02, 09:05 AM
(.......For the record, I'm actually a little irked that it's taking them soooo long to put them in paperback. Talk about milking it for all it's worth...)

Just curious where you live and where you shop. Wal-Mart and Sams both have carried the paperbacks on all the books since they first started being published.

It was almost if they were simultaniously published in hardback and paperback. I know about a year ago you could even buy the first 5 or 6 in paperback in a set.

If you don't live in the US that may explain it, or if you haven't checked out your local Wal-Mart (everybody has a Wal-Mart.....don't they:confused:) you should be able to locate them in paperback without too much trouble.

In fact my local Wal-Mart has a huge display of both the hard back editions and the paperback editions.

Good luck in your hunt.

P.S. I understand the point about the Veggie Tales (Bob is watching)

Flannel Avenger
04-03-02, 07:41 PM
I live in Raleigh, NC. My mom goes to Wal-Mart and Sams all the time and keeps an eye out for them, but it takes them forever to get from hardback to paperback. The last one I have is Assasins, and they've published 2 since then!!!

selah
04-03-02, 09:39 PM
Which causes me to wonder that these people's real objectives are - is it to gain believers and help them to understand the Gospel? Or is it to make money? (or a little bit of both, maybe?) Or maybe it's because that even they themselves are not well-educated as far as "advanced" Christianity. (sidenote) - I think that for the most part, these folks are sincere in their motives, but sometimes the love of money can cloud one's judgement.

I think there might be a third possibility in addition to greed and not being educated enough. A lot of churches and Christian organizations do outreach programs where it seems the number of people praying the sinner's prayer at the end is the measure of success. There's nothing wrong with people turning away from sin and towards Jesus; it's just that all too often, once they've said the sinner's prayer, it's like, "where do I go from here?" I've seen a lot of people get really excited about Jesus, read a few Philip Yancey books, go to a fellowship where the sermon is "outreach geared" and therefore all milk and very little meat, and then out of the blue they just fade out of the whole church scene altogether. There's nothing wrong with outreach, but I think the whole Christian culture has gotten too wrapped up with how many people are saying the sinner's prayer, and not paying enough attention to how to feed them once they've taken that step.

trixiepup
04-04-02, 12:33 AM
i haven't read the left behind series, but i went to a christian high school, and i read a decent number of christian type novels and such.

from my experience, i don't think that anyone who wasn't a christian would read them w/o being forced to (or desperate for something to read, which was me in hs).

i think chrisianity is somewhat commercialized, but that is the case with a lot of other religions (eastern religions spring to mind...).

i do think that there is a lot of focus on getting people to say the sinner's prayer, but really, getting converts is a goal of the world religions i'm somewhat familiar with.

i think that all these instant spirituality products make people feel good about themselves. sorta like buying organic stuff at whole foods while driving an suv while wearing sweatshop made clothing.

it seems that the mass marketing of these products is in line with america's consumption drive...short attention span, must have new, shiny things to keep a life or faith interesting. if these things weren't made, i think a lot fewer people would want to become christians....i mean, what's the point? there's no special show to watch, no special wwjd button to wear (are those still in style?), no special tshirt to wear, or music to listen to....

>now i go back to tend to my homework<