PDA

View Full Version : Choosing a Church


Bayrat
06-19-08, 12:11 AM
Although a member of the Methodist church, I have not attended much. In my youth I was an Acolyte and participated in Sunday school, caroling and such. Always had a relationship with God, sometimes stronger than others.

A couple of months ago we decided to go back to organized religion and attend services regularly. The old church does not fit our mold especially with some of its views recently.

We have been going to a Baptist church, very nice people but wow, very much different than what I have seen before. It seems one can pick versus out of the Bible to support almost any point of view. Some say you must be born again and baptized by submersion. Others say no, your baptism when a baby is sufficient if accompanied with parental religious education.

I listen to the Catholic point of view and some of that draws me to look more deeply into that faith. My wife and I believe that as long as you accept Jesus and live according to His rules the best you can, you are good to go.

This is all extremely confusing. The Catholic Church, or the founders thereof, were the people that assembled the books that went into the Bible. That in itself has me thinking.

I am not trying to start a battle here, just looking for opinions if that is possible. Since I am new, I have no idea where the folks on this board are at relative to denominations, so if this question is not appropriate, let me know please.

Don

Ann
06-19-08, 12:55 AM
Your question is very appropriate.

Caretaker
06-19-08, 01:12 AM
http://www.justforcatholics.org/

Bayrat
06-19-08, 08:11 PM
I read the link and that is not entirely news to me, I helped my wife do a paper on the Catholic Church and its Popes. No matter what the faith, there will always be those that are not in it for the right reasons, whether they sit in a pew or lead the church.

Let's face it, the longer this society is in existence, the further we get from the true meaning of life. Europe is socialist and we are not far behind. Along with that political philosophy comes the cleansing of religion from the population in order that they worship elected leaders. Our youth are programmed by video games, society is becoming scary.

I am more concerned with the customs, traditions and rituals as they relate to the Bible. That is where I get lost. Are these based upon Biblical testimonies or have they been added into the Church more to glorify the leaders rather than God?

Their steadfast adherence to moral values and tradition impresses me.

Don

Caretaker
06-19-08, 10:37 PM
The Roman Catholic Church teaches that grace is dispensed through the sacraments of the church. The church becomes the intermediary between the adherent and God, and necessary for salvation.

The Roman Catholic Catechism:

1127 Celebrated worthily in faith, the sacraments confer the grace that they signify.48 They are efficacious because in them Christ himself is at work: it is he who baptizes, he who acts in his sacraments in order to communicate the grace that each sacrament signifies. The Father always hears the prayer of his Son's Church which, in the epiclesis of each sacrament, expresses her faith in the power of the Spirit. As fire transforms into itself everything it touches, so the Holy Spirit transforms into the divine life whatever is subjected to his power.

1128 This is the meaning of the Church's affirmation49 that the sacraments act ex opere operato (literally: "by the very fact of the action's being performed"), i.e., by virtue of the saving work of Christ, accomplished once for all. It follows that "the sacrament is not wrought by the righteousness of either the celebrant or the recipient, but by the power of God."50 From the moment that a sacrament is celebrated in accordance with the intention of the Church, the power of Christ and his Spirit acts in and through it, independently of the personal holiness of the minister. Nevertheless, the fruits of the sacraments also depend on the disposition of the one who receives them.

1129 The Church affirms that for believers the sacraments of the New Covenant are necessary for salvation.51 "Sacramental grace" is the grace of the Holy Spirit, given by Christ and proper to each sacrament. The Spirit heals and transforms those who receive him by conforming them to the Son of God. The fruit of the sacramental life is that the Spirit of adoption makes the faithful partakers in the divine nature52 by uniting them in a living union with the only Son, the Savior.


Here is the Catholic Catechism online:

http://www.scborromeo.org/ccc.htm


The Bible teaches that we are justified by faith alone in Christ alone.

We are justified solely through the Blood of Christ.


Romans 5:1,9 “Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ:” “Much more then, being now justified by his blood, we shall be saved from wrath through him.” Man’s legal standing with Heaven is one of condemnation, and worthy of the righteous wrath of almighty God. Romans 3:23 “ For all have sinned and come short of the glory of God;”

Justification is the act of God whereby He accepts the blood of Christ as the complete and satisfying sacrifice for all human sin, propitiation, thus changing our legal status and establishing a means of reconciliation with man.

Believers are justified by the grace of God through faith. Titus 3:7 “That being justified by his grace, we should be made heirs according to the hope of eternal life.” Romans 3:28 “ Therefore we conclude that a man is justified by faith without the deeds of the law.” We see that the status of man is changed from that of the condemned to that of an heir, one who is able to inherit. Thus man is reconciled to God through the propitiation of Jesus Christ and restored to full legal righteous standing.

From the Council of Trent:


Canon 11. If anyone says that men are justified either by the sole imputation of the justice of Christ or by the sole remission of sins, excluding grace and charity which is poured into their hearts by the Holy Spirit and inheres in them, or also that the grace which justifies us is only the favour of God, let him be anathema. (see note 1)

Canon 12. If anyone says that justifying faith is nothing else than confidence in divine mercy, which remits sins for Christ's sake, or that it is this confidence alone that justifies us, let him be anathema.

Canon 24. If anyone says that the justice (righteousness) received is not preserved and also not increased before God through good works but that those works are merely the fruits and signs of justification obtained, but not the cause of the increase, let him be anathema.

Canon 30. If anyone says that after the reception of the grace of justification the guilt is so remitted and the debt of eternal punishment so blotted out to every repentant sinner, that no debt of temporal punishment remains to be discharged either in this world or in purgatory before the gates of heaven can be opened, let him be anathema.

Canon 32. If anyone says that the good works of the one justified are in such manner the gifts of God that they are not also the good merits of him justified; or that the one justified by the good works that he performs by the grace of God and the merit of Jesus Christ (of whom one is a living member), the justified does not truly merit an increase of grace, and eternal life, provided that one dies in the state of grace, the attainment of this eternal life, as well as an increase in glory, let him be anathema.



++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++

I would encourage you to look most carefully at the core theology which lies behind the church practices.

I would examine most carefully extra-Biblical teachings and rituals, and that we have ONE MEDIATOR between God and man, who is Christ Jesus our Lord.

I would never want to place another human being between my heart and the Throne of God, and depend upon them for my salvation.

Caretaker
06-19-08, 10:47 PM
I read the link and that is not entirely news to me, I helped my wife do a paper on the Catholic Church and its Popes. No matter what the faith, there will always be those that are not in it for the right reasons, whether they sit in a pew or lead the church.

Let's face it, the longer this society is in existence, the further we get from the true meaning of life. Europe is socialist and we are not far behind. Along with that political philosophy comes the cleansing of religion from the population in order that they worship elected leaders. Our youth are programmed by video games, society is becoming scary.

I am more concerned with the customs, traditions and rituals as they relate to the Bible. That is where I get lost. Are these based upon Biblical testimonies or have they been added into the Church more to glorify the leaders rather than God?

Their steadfast adherence to moral values and tradition impresses me.

Don

There was a reason that Martin Luther tacked his declaration to the church door. The selling of indulgences to garner wealth.

Here is a quick list of extra-Biblical practices and the dates they were formally adopted:

1. Prayers for the dead .....300 A.D.
2. Making the sign of the cross .....300 A.D.
3. Veneration of angels & dead saints .....375 A.D
4. Use of images in worship .....375 A D.
5. The Mass as a daily celebration .....394 A.D.
6. Beginning of the exaltation of Mary; the term, "Mother of God" applied at Council of Ephesus .....431 AD.
7. Extreme Unction (Last Rites) .....526 A.D.
8. Doctrine of Purgatory-Gregory I .....593 A.D.
9. Prayers to Mary & dead saints .....600 A.D.
10. Worship of cross, images & relics .....786 A.D.
11. Canonization of dead saints .....995 A.D.
12. Celibacy of priesthood .....1079 A.D.
13. The Rosary .....1090 A.D.
14. Indulgences .....1190 A.D.
15. Transubstantiation-Innocent III .....1215 A.D.
16. Auricular Confession of sins to a priest .....1215 A.D.
17. Adoration of the wafer (Host) .....1220 A.D.
18. Cup forbidden to the people at communion .....1414 A.D.
19. Purgatory proclaimed as a dogma .....1439 A.D.
20. The doctrine of the Seven Sacraments confirmed .....1439 A.D.
21. Tradition declared of equal authority with Bible by Council of Trent.....1545 A.D.
22. Apocryphal books added to Bible as canon.....1546 A.D.
23. Immaculate Conception of Mary .....1854 A.D.
24. Infallibility of the pope in matters of faith and morals, proclaimed by the Vatican Council .....1870 A.D.
25. Assumption of the Virgin Mary (bodily ascension into heaven shortly after her death) .....1950 A.D.
26. Mary proclaimed Mother of the Church .....1965 A.D.

969 "This motherhood of Mary in the order of grace continues uninterruptedly from the consent which she loyally gave at the Annunciation and which she sustained without wavering beneath the cross, until the eternal fulfillment of all the elect. Taken up to heaven she did not lay aside this saving office but by her manifold intercession continues to bring us the gifts of eternal salvation . . . . Therefore the Blessed Virgin is invoked in the Church under the titles of Advocate, Helper, Benefactress, and Mediatrix."512

The Bible teaches: Christ Jesus is the one mediator to whom we can entrust all our cares and petitions. I Timothy 2:5, John 14:13&14, I Peter 5:7.

Main Entry: me•di•a•trix
Pronunciation: -'A-triks
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin, feminine of mediator
Date: 15th century
: a woman who is a mediator

Caretaker
06-19-08, 10:56 PM
God bless you;

There is a marvelous book online entitled, The Puritans Hope, which details the reformation and the true desire for righteousness. One should open their heart to the Lord Jesus Christ. He is not to be found limited by ritual and practice of a specific sect, but living, guiding, illuminating the pathway of His perfect will from within the hearts and lives of His precious children.

http://www.revival-library.org/index.html?http://www.revival-library.org/catalogues/puritan/murrayi-puritanhope/contents.htm

Bayrat
06-20-08, 01:19 PM
Thank you for all the information, I have some reading to do...

Caretaker
06-20-08, 01:36 PM
Thank you for all the information, I have some reading to do...


May our Heavenly Father truly bless you in your search for a church family, and may He guide you with His Word and His eternal love for His precious children.

Susan
06-20-08, 08:38 PM
Bayrat, if you like the liturgical form of worship, you might look for a conservative Anglican church. The Anglican Mission in the Americas (http://www.theamia.org/) is a conservative branch of the Anglican communion that is evangelical, evangelistic, and biblically orthodox. The mission is based in Rwanda--Africa is sending missionaries to us!

Ann
06-20-08, 11:39 PM
The most important thing in choosing a church is praying and asking for God's direction.

Things I look for in a church include
1.God's word is taught in truth and love and power
2. Is centered on Jesus Christ not on a personality, tradition, etc.
3. It is small enough so people are not lost in the crowd or has opportunities for small group interaction.
4. People do interact not just sit and watch a performnance and then go home.
5. It appears that the people care about each other and are not closed to new people in their hearts and minds.
6. Does not appear over legalistsicbut does hold astandard of righteousness.
7. Not so wealthy or upwardly minded socio-economically that I can't possibly fit in and nether can the ppl to whom we minister.
8. Has at least some degree of concern for people in need.

It also helps if the pastor really pastors and there is a respect for the gifts of the spirit and real worship preferably scripture based worship.

Amada who has visited the place we fellowship is probably chuckeling at some of these because she knows the ways that it does and does not fit these criteria but that goes back to the first thing praying and going where God wants you.

Susan
06-21-08, 10:05 AM
Yes, well... :)

The church we are in does not look like I would have imagined a place where I would be worshipping, but it is exactly where God wants us worshipping and ministering right now. Oddly enough, except for #3 on your list (and it really does not "feel" like a big church) it fits all of your criteria.

Bayrat
06-26-08, 08:06 AM
Thank you both, I must admit that the Bible Baptist we have been attending recently fits most of those criteria!

Bayrat
07-14-08, 09:00 PM
Well, back at it again. I understand the Catholic rituals being brought into question here. The wife and I plan on attending services at a couple of other churches in the area.

We honestly love the congregation at the Baptist Church but the service is half singing and then finally on to other aspects. I am not against singing, did the caroling as a teen, but would like a service that contains more preaching and bible reading than choir practice. We have been going there since Easter to give it a fair test and not base our feeling on just a few services.

Am I being unrealistic?

Orpheus42
07-15-08, 01:17 AM
Bayrat, if you like the liturgical form of worship, you might look for a conservative Anglican church. The Anglican Mission in the Americas (http://www.theamia.org/) is a conservative branch of the Anglican communion that is evangelical, evangelistic, and biblically orthodox. The mission is based in Rwanda--Africa is sending missionaries to us!
I still go to a regular old Episcopal Church, U.S.A. ;)

I have to say I'm definitely a fan of the more sacramental understanding of worship. Having the service focused around the reading of scripture, the prayers of the people, and the taking of the one sacrament Jesus instituted personally, rather than on any one person's personality or anything like that, is a very refreshing thing.

Even if the church we're planting ends up taking root, I will still at least semi-regularly attend St. Paul's.

larry9179
07-15-08, 02:11 PM
Denominations are products of Satan. It doesn't matter what label you make the tithe check out to, but what does matter is whether you can find a group of Christians who're commmitted to changing the world. God loves Catholics as much as He loves Baptists, and He loves Baptists as much as He loves Muslims and Jews and Buddhists and Wiccans and atheists.

If you're looking for a church to feel comfortable in, avoid it. Find one that will challenge your faith. A lot of stuff done in God's name has nothing to do with His will and purpose for the Church. He's never learned anything new about Himself while listening to a sermon, He could care less about a building fund; what God really wants is to spend time with you.

Ann
07-15-08, 02:22 PM
I agree with you, Larry, about God loving all people however that does not mean all roads are equally right or go the same place. From posts of your before I hope you would still agree that the way to God, the only way, is Jesus Christ. John 14:6 Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me. It is not the "lable" that makes the difference but a personal relationship with Christ. One is very unlikely to find such a relationship through a group that denies that Jesus is the Son of God or has as a regular practice things that God says are an abomination to Him.

Bayrat
07-15-08, 09:31 PM
I still go to a regular old Episcopal Church, U.S.A. ;)

I have to say I'm definitely a fan of the more sacramental understanding of worship. Having the service focused around the reading of scripture, the prayers of the people, and the taking of the one sacrament Jesus instituted personally, rather than on any one person's personality or anything like that, is a very refreshing thing.

Even if the church we're planting ends up taking root, I will still at least semi-regularly attend St. Paul's.

Funny you should mention that, we are going to attend a service at one very near our home.

larry9179
07-16-08, 01:39 PM
I agree with you, Larry, about God loving all people however that does not mean all roads are equally right or go the same place. From posts of your before I hope you would still agree that the way to God, the only way, is Jesus Christ. John 14:6 Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me. It is not the "lable" that makes the difference but a personal relationship with Christ. One is very unlikely to find such a relationship through a group that denies that Jesus is the Son of God or has as a regular practice things that God says are an abomination to Him.

Not at all, Ann. I haven't backed away from Jesus being the only way to salvation. My point was that denominations divide Christians. Churches are always trying to catch some other churches' fish. Being a Christian isn't about where you worship, it's Who you worship; and most churches focus more on getting congregations to submit to their style and interpretation of worship than they do on sharing the love and grace of Christ.

A woman from a Baptist church that my daughter had visited dropped by one Saturday to make sure my daughter was going to be ready to ride the church bus the next day. My daughter was in Georgia staying with her mom at the time, but the lady felt compelled to 'witness' to me before leaving. She asked me if I knew where I would go if I died that very day. I told her that I was a believer, I just went to a different church than my daughter. She then said to me that just going to church wasn't going to get me saved. So I informed her that I had a relationship with Jesus Christ and that I myself used to be a Baptist, but then I got saved. She huffed off and hasn't been back. I don't need some overweight, Bible-thumping, unloving Christian to lead me to the Lord. Jesus drew me to Him, and He didn't do it by handing me a religious tract or asking stupid questions He'd learned from some "Witnessing 101" Sunday School class.

A church is about relationships, and if those relationships don't promote love, respect, honor, and genuine caring for the people in the relationship, then it's not a church, it's a religion. Jesus said that loving one another was just as important as loving God with all our hearts, all our strength and all our will. He's looking for a bride that is focussed on Him, not schitzo like the Church is today.

I do believe that attending church is important, but I go because I love the people there. We've stood by each other when times were good and when they were bad. My pastor is my best friend, and he can and has on several occasions called me an ass and a saint in his messages. Honesty, not the hard-love that one gets in rehab, but the loving honesty that says, "Brother, you've made a mess of things, but if you'll let me help, we'll get you through this" is what we need more of in churches today. The Church is all lovey-dovey when things are going well: the building fund is on time and budget, there are enough volunteers in the nursery, and the pastor is drawing crowds every Sunday. But let the worship leader and his wife split up and all of a sudden it becomes very uncomfortable in most churches. Eventually people in the congregation will start siding with the husband or with the wife and one will leave; when the proper response would have been to embrace them and show them both they were loved and appreciated regardless of their personal issues. I've seen it first-hand with one of my best friends and no amount of 'Recovery' ministries is going to solve the root of the problem in relationships: the lack of unconditional love, grace and forgiveness that facilitates the movement of the Holy Spirit in our circumstances.

Ann
07-16-08, 09:45 PM
Yes indeed it is Who not where you worship.

Over the yrs I have seen more than my share of churches that in my opinion placed more focus on themselves than on Jesus but I have also been blessed to be part of some and acquainted with more that truly desire for Jesus to be at home and have His way in them corporately and individually.

Each time you share the story of that lady who came to see your daughter it makes me very sad both because she did not recognize Christ in you and because all that you were able to see in her was a physically unattractive person who annoyed you and not someone who may have been sincerly concerned for you even if she was inept at sharing Jesus. At the same time I have a major horor of "scalp hunting". I have a personal problem with groups which have help ministries as Caring Hands does that pretty much require someone to "get saved" or at least listen to a semi sermon before they can get help. Sometimes I find myself overcompensating for that and not sharing Christ's love in words when I should.

It seems to me that sometimes we in the home church and small church groups have as much rigidity about the large and mainline churches as they have about us...can it be that we too are helping to divide Christ's body? Have you seen that sort of things happeing in your area too?

Bayrat
07-17-08, 06:52 PM
There is a particular requirement in the church we have been attending that requires someone to write a testimony of how they came to Christ and when they realized they were saved before membership or baptismal will be allowed.

I don't have a problem with that but my wife does. My faith has grown over my lifetime and to pinpoint that exact moment might be difficult.

You both make excellent points.

Ann
07-17-08, 09:45 PM
I can see the fellowship wanting to be sure someone has had a real experience of receiving Christ as Savior. Perhaps there may be a better way to do that. Where we are requiring a written testimony would eliminate many very strong Christians simply bec literacy was not a major concern in this area until 25-30 yrs ago and up till 10 or so yrs ago ago a child who did not learn to read readily was just kind of shunted off.

Bayrat
07-17-08, 10:50 PM
Ann, I can agree to a point but isn't the idea to bring Christ into people's lives. Some sort of "test" to me is a bit untrusting, especially when a person has spent time with the pastor and others discussing this in classes.

If I were a devious person I could pretend to believe, write a testimony that would boil the water in the pool and everyone would love me for what I am not. In reality, I would not be in any church if I did not believe. That is why what Larry says makes a ton of sense. It resides in your head and your heart, not within a bunch of rules made up by humans.

I guess the best way I can describe this is as follows. I am the independent Baptist Church, don't want to follow the laws of any particular sect but will practice directly from the Bible. BUT, don't ask to join my church or be baptized (we both already were as children in this case anyway) until we approve of you.

That particular thing has rubbed us both the wrong way.

Ann
07-18-08, 04:48 AM
By original definition the church is an assembly of believers. So in that context the idea if being sure a person is a believer before receiving them into membership in a group of believers makes some sense. This is presuming there to be a difference between being a member and being someone who is welcomed at the church. However I was not supporting the essay method but saying it was not a particularly effective way in the case of all believers. One man I really look up to in the Lord can not read a word unless the Holy Spirit shows him what is on the page though He can quote chapters from memory, and explain it with both depth and smplicity and accuracy too. I have been blessed just being present while he prayed not by eloquent words for he was not praying to be heard but just by the sense of Jesus presence. But he'd sure flunk the written essay exam.

My personal convictions in the matter of tests and "approval" are that if a person is in Christ they should be able to recognize the presence of Christ or the absence of Christ in another person especially if they have been around them and listened to them a while. So why would there need to be a test? I suppose that if one sought membership in a fellowship group it would be reasonable for them to check your qualifications in some manner if they were operating in the natural just as a football team would be sure someone coming out for the team had the basics of the game and also wasn't just there to learn the plays and signals to report them to some opponent. Exactly why it should be necessary for a church to operate only in the natural I would rather not speculate.

I have never seen church membership the way a lot of people see it. To me when someone receives Christ as their Savior He makes them a part of His church. This church Biblically called the body of Christ is the only church membership I see in scripture as really counting for anything. There are of course different local expressions of the body of Christ and the Lord hopefully leads and draws us to the part of His body in our locality where He knows we need to be at any given time. We need to assemble ourselves together with our brothers and sisters and function as a family in the Lord. I just don't see the "signing on the dotted line" thing and the our group vs some other group thing. Using the illustration of a family we have our home fellowship (nuclear family) - the place the Lord has put us as our principal place of interacting with other members of His body, the place we mainly learn and share and grow and accept leadership and discipline, but we also have extended family (other believers in the area) and even more extended family (believers in other places)

Maybe the best solution to the membership testing is to spend more time with Jesus so that we can recognize the family resembelence when we come in contact with someone in whom He lives and can recognize also when someone has not yet received His love and conviction for salvation and when someone is plain out faking. If you have been married any length of time you'd recognize your wife anywhere no matter what she wore. Similarly we need to spend enough time close enough to Jesus so we can recognize Him no matter whose skin and bones He's wearing at the moment.

Bayrat
07-18-08, 08:49 PM
Right on Ann. In fact, there are certain members there that seem to "glow" and other that are there because their spouse says so. I can feel it. I suppose given what I am encountering now is exactly why I quit going to organized worship years ago. I always felt that one lived to do Christ's work every day, Sunday was no different.

Of course, I have fallen off the wagon many times during those years myself.

Bayrat
07-20-08, 11:09 AM
We attended the beautiful (very old) little Episcopal Church near our home today and really loved it. Although some of the customs are difficult for us to follow without some advance tutoring we were able to muddle our way through them without messing up too badly.

We were welcomed by everyone and in fact I was asked by one of the deacons to assist him during the service. I was honored to do so.

Looks like next week will be an early service in that little church.

Ann
07-20-08, 01:28 PM
:)

Susan
07-21-08, 02:38 PM
We attended the beautiful (very old) little Episcopal Church near our home today and really loved it. Although some of the customs are difficult for us to follow without some advance tutoring we were able to muddle our way through them without messing up too badly.

We were welcomed by everyone and in fact I was asked by one of the deacons to assist him during the service. I was honored to do so.

Looks like next week will be an early service in that little church.

Our family has found a haven in the Anglican Communion.

Bayrat
07-21-08, 07:10 PM
Thanks for the encouragement Amanda. I feel really good about this place, the way we were treated and accepted without "screening" and actually asked to participate in the service. Am looking forward to going back.

Bayrat
07-21-08, 07:12 PM
By the way, I was going to post a painting of the church but can not seem to find a method here.

larry9179
07-22-08, 12:59 PM
Thanks for the encouragement Amanda. I feel really good about this place, the way we were treated and accepted without "screening" and actually asked to participate in the service. Am looking forward to going back.

I love the people in my church family, even the pastor's mother who is one of those in-your-face Christians. We don't always agree on everything, but if one of us needs for anything, the others will be there for them. In this way, I believe I'm in a New Testament church. We have no traditions, no rituals, no requirements to present your resume so that we can determine if you're good enough to join us. If you come once, you're our welcome guest; if you come back, you're an old friend; if you come a third time you're a member; and if you can't come we'll still love you and pray for you. We are far from perfect, in fact, we're a gang of misfits; but we know God's love and we encourage one another. In many ways we don't want to grow in numbers because we wouldn't be able to share the depth of our relationships. So, if you feel welcome and loved, I'd say you have found a church home that you can prosper in. God bless!

Susan
07-24-08, 04:44 PM
By the way, I was going to post a painting of the church but can not seem to find a method here.

We can't post pictures on all of the boards due to the amount of band width available. You can post the picture on, say, Photobucket (http://photobucket.com/), and then you can post the URL on here so people can go check it out.

Bayrat
07-24-08, 06:54 PM
Let's try this.

http://img133.imageshack.us/img133/5485/spchurchtu9.jpg

Susan
07-25-08, 06:11 PM
Very pretty. When was it built, do you know?

Bayrat
07-25-08, 09:43 PM
Not sure Amada but I do know it is quite old.

Susan
07-26-08, 01:47 PM
What state is it in? There's a beautiful Episcopal church in Ocala, FL that was built post Civil War that is still in use, and it looks similar to your picture.

Bayrat
07-26-08, 01:55 PM
This one is in New York, in a quaint waterfront village on the south shore of Lake Ontario.

Susan
07-26-08, 04:57 PM
Grace Church (http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f55/doule1953/P1010025.jpg)

Bayrat
07-26-08, 08:21 PM
That is a beautiful church, much larger and fancier than our little one. The stained glass and lanterns inside ours really give the Christ Church and air of old and a feeling of warmth. It is an extremely small building, perhaps 30'x40'.

Bayrat
06-08-09, 08:10 PM
We have been attending our little church now for close to a year and we love it. Thanks for all the advise and for the couple of suggestions to try the Anglican Church.

We have readings each Sunday and guess who is doing readings there now. Led the Prayers of the People a couple of weeks ago, and last Sunday, the prayer during a Baptism along with the Bishop.

Certainly no pigeon holing here, everyone is treated as a brother or a sister. Thanks again for the guidance, we found our home.

Ann
06-08-09, 08:27 PM
I'm glad you found a church that is right for you. :)